Rising Light: Angelique Ambrosio and the “Language of Light”

Written by Harley Anderson on . Posted in Rising light

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© Angelique Ambrosio

© Angelique Ambrosio

Rising Light is an article series highlighting promising photography students from all over the world. This month we introduce Angelique Ambrosio at School of Visual Arts in NYC.

Part of making it as a photographer is finding a style that sets you apart from the rest of the pack. Some photographers find their stylistic niche early on, some later, and some never. Angelique Ambrosio is the first kind.

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On-location photography in the Alps

Written by Jens-Linus Lundgren-Widén on . Posted in On location, Videos

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Portrait and editorial photographer Francesco Ridolfi is just as acquired with fine art projects as he is with commercial photography. Recently he got commissioned by König to do a campaign shoot in the Alps. So he filled his car with some Profoto B1 Off-Camera Flashes, Profoto D1 Monolights, and the BatPac, headed up the snowy mountains, and shot a behind the scenes video of it all.

The whole shoot took a total of three days. The first day was basically just for the trip and a quick location scouting of the place. Day two and three Francesco and his crew did the actual shoot. Since he was photographing in a pretty rough environment he needed equipment he could rely on.

“You don’t want to have any problem when you are on assignment for a client!” Francesco explains.

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What’s the Difference Between a Bare Head and a White Beauty Dish?

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Off-camera flash, On location, Portrait photography

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© Jared Platt

© Jared Platt

What’s the Difference? is a series of lighting tutorials. Each article responds to a single question. In this post, Jared Platt explains the difference between using a bare head and a white beauty dish.

Photographers instinctively know that a soft box creates soft light, it’s in the name for heaven sake! But the reason is sometimes less obvious to some. If you already know the answer to this quiz, don’t worry, we will get a little more detailed in a moment. The sun (less than an inch in diameter in the sky) is a very hard light and creates very hard shadows, but a 4 foot softbox, placed next to your portrait subject will create soft, beautiful light.  Take that softbox a few hundred yards away from the subject (if the strobe was strong enough) and that light would feel a lot more like the hard sunlight you so desperately want to avoid. Simply put, the quality of light (whether a light is soft or hard) depends on the size of the light to the subject.  No matter what light you have and what modifier you are using, the closer you bring the light to the subject, the softer it will become (even if it is also becoming more powerful in the process).

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What’s the difference between using CTO gels and CTB gels?

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Off-camera flash, On location, Portrait photography

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© Jared Platt

© Jared Platt

What’s the Difference? is a series of lighting tutorials. Each article responds to a single question. In this post, Jared Platt shows how to achieve different effects with CTO and CTB gels.

Color of light is a critical part of photographic lighting, but most photographers do not pay much attention to it when using flash. Each light source has a particular color cast to it, which is why your camera has white balance settings. When you choose the proper white balance for the color of light you are photographing, the color in the exposure will be neutral, and look correct. In mixed lighting conditions, where you have multiple colors of light, the light you white balance for will be neutral, while the other light will end up either too warm, too cool, too green, etc. In most cases, you will have one primary light source and color and if you want to keep your image color neutral, you will need to alter the color of your flash to match it. This is where color gels come in.
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Gravity defying dance photography

Written by Jens-Linus Lundgren-Widén on . Posted in On location

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© Kevin Richards

© Kevin Richardson

New York based fitness photographer Kevin Richardson calls his niche dance and movement photography. With meticulous precision he catches professional dancers mid-air, mid-pose, seemingly defying gravity. We asked him how, and why, he does it.

During the past couple of years Kevin Richardson has been hauling his Profoto D1’s and Profoto B1’s around the streets of New York. This ongoing venture is part of an imagery that goes under the name Dance As Art: the New York City Photography Project, a hundred some photos depicting professional dancers striking poses, not seldom in the middle of a leap.

“I had this grand idea of creating images of dancers as these gravity defying, agile and powerful beings, and New York City in the background as secondary character.”

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