Jewelry photography with the ProBox

Written by Jens-Linus Lundgren-Widén on . Posted in Product photography

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Hadi Sabbagh

©Hadi Sabbagh

 

Hadi Sabbagh is one of Iran’s most renowned photographers. Working his way up from the local newspaper, he is now the country’s go-to jewelry photographer. We had a quick chat with him.

Hadi Sabbagh began his career in a local newspaper. He was soon assigned to work at the layout section, which marked the start of a 15-year-long journey through the graphic and advertising field. It was during the shift from old to new camera technology that Hadi took up photography. Basically, he got tired of photographers who worked with negatives so he decided to go it alone in the industry.

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A week in a photographer’s life: Wednesday – Fast fashion

Written by Jens-Linus Lundgren-Widén on . Posted in Commercial photography, Editorial photography, Fashion photography, On location, Product photography, Videos

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Every new day is a new challenge for a photographer. Will it be a portrait, sports, fashion or something else completely? And no matter what that day brings, it must always end in the same way – with a great shot. Follow acclaimed fashion and portrait photographer Andreas Lundberg over one week as he tried out the new Profoto D2 – the world’s fastest monolight – and see how he overcomes his challenges. This Wednesday, fast fashion was on the agenda at an on-location shoot where he didn’t want to run out of time.

For a photographer speed is not one thing – it is many. Flash duration, freeze mode, and high-speed sync are all important aspects of speed, but not the only ones. With patented TTL technology, the Profoto D2 Monolight helps you speed up your workflow. Just point and shoot and the D2 will automatically adjust its output for perfect exposure. Manual mode is available at the click of a button and switching between both modes with settings intact just makes everything move faster.

When you shoot on-location, you do not want to be dependent on ambient light. The sun can play tricks on you, casting shades or reflections where you do not want them, and sometimes it can even hide behind a cloud or a building. You need to have a reliable and fast flash in order to control the light.

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A week in a photographer’s life: Tuesday – Moving still

Written by Jens-Linus Lundgren-Widén on . Posted in On location, Portrait photography, Product photography, Videos

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Every new day is a new challenge for a photographer. Will it be a portrait, sports, fashion or something else completely? And no matter what that day brings, it must always end in the same way – with a great shot. Follow acclaimed fashion and portrait photographer Andreas Lundberg over one week as he tries out the new Profoto D2 – the world’s fastest monolight – and see how he overcomes his challenges. Tuesday he spent shooting still life in high speed, giving fast food a totally new meaning.

The Profoto D2 is designed to be the fastest monolight in the world. And with speed comes versatility. For Andreas Lundberg, renowned fashion and portrait photographer, speed is more than the ability to freeze a moment. Every day he is challenged to act fast, deliver fast and capture fast. Every day he needs to move faster, deliver more and take his images to a new level.

“I’m the kind of person that feels that life is too short not to try out new things,” he says.

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How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Product photography

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How-to-use-backlight-to-photograph-glassware-Taka-Kawachi-1

©Taka Kawachi

The awesome photography site Popular Photography has an ongoing article series called How To, in which photographers are interviewed about the different lighting techniques they use to achieve different effects.

The latest article highlights an ambitious shoot done by New York-based product photographer Taka Kawachi and how he used backlight to photograph glassware for a department store chain.

“For two solid weeks in 2012, Taka Kawachi, a product specialist who works out of a studio in Nyack, NY, shot nothing but glassware for a major department store chain,” writes Peter Kolonia. “Juice, highball, and shot glasses, tumblers, stemware of every size and shape, and, yes, pilsner glasses and beer mugs. If he wasn’t a master of lighting glass at the project’s outset, he certainly was by its end.”

Head over to the Popular Photography site for the full story.

Shooting a 52 Kilo Koran and 3000 Year Old Sumarian Tablets with the Profoto D1

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Product photography

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John Rylands Library in Manchester is not your everyday library. For one thing, it’s old. Opened to the public on January 1, 1900, the library celebrated it hundredth birthday more than fourteen years ago. But when it comes to age, the building can hardly compete with the stuff that’s in it.

Housing a priceless 52 kilo koran, ancient Egyptian papyrus fragments and 3000 year old Sumarian clay tablets to name just a few examples, John Rylands is not so much a library as a giant treasure chest of historic documents and artifacts.

Moving into the 21st century,  the library has undergone the ambitious task of digitizing all these priceless objects. Photographing objects such as these obviously requires the highest possible resolution and the most consistent color temperature available. To achieve this, the photographers at John Rylands rely on the Phase One 645 DF body, the Phase One iXR body, the IQ180 digital back and the Profoto D1 monolight. The flashes are synced with an Air Sync unit.

The video was shot by our good friends at Phase One, so there is obviously a lot camera tech in it. But keep your eyes and ears open and you’ll get a few pointers on the lighting as well. Read more