Posts Tagged ‘Softbox RFi 3′ Octa’

Rising Light: Adrian Rae at Seattle Central College

Written by Harley Anderson on . Posted in Rising light

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© Adrian Rae

© Adrian Rae

Rising Light is an article series highlighting promising photography students from all over the world. This time we talk to Adrian Rae at Seattle Central College, who has her aim set on editoral photography.

In order to succeed as a photographer, or any profession for that matter, you have to see the bigger picture. Having ideals is fine, but if you plan on earning a living doing what you love best you need to understand what it takes to achieve your intended goal. Adrian Rae gets it.

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Striving for Something out of the Ordinary

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait photography

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©Drew Gurian

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Every now and then, he’ll be bringing you a behind-the-scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This month we get to join him behind the scenes of a recent shoot with renowned director Stephen Daldry.

Back in February, I was assigned to photograph Stephen Daldry, the Tony Award winning and Academy Award nominated British producer and director of Billy Elliot and The Hours, amongst others.

Whenever I have a shoot like this, I’m well aware that it will most likely be five minutes or less with whoever i’m shooting, and that I very well may have a publicist or three breathing down my neck while shooting.

Aside from time constraints, dealing with potentially big personalities, and multiple publicists, I generally have no idea what the location will look like until I get there. We should all know by now that it’s our job as photographers to do as much research as possible before the shoot, so we’re very well-informed walking into any situation.  On these shoots- which are often assigned to me the night before, I’m told to meet at a theatre, or in a hotel room, but that’s about all I have to go on. Of course I make calls to the location to try and get some idea of the size, overall feel and light at the location, but there’s quite a bit of unknown.  In other words, it’s a crapshoot until I get there. Good times, right?? Read more

What Is In a Portrait Photographer’s Gear Pack?

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait photography

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Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind-the-scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This time, he talks about the lighting gear that he brings to a shoot. 

Lots of photographers think that in order to produce professional looking photos, they need a ton of gear. Of course, there’s plenty of situations out there that involve a sizable production, but for the most part, striving to keep things simple is a good rule of thumb to live by.

Every now and again, a client calls and needs me to shoot something that involves every piece of gear I own, and then some. For the most part however,  I’ve worked out a fairly stripped down gear pack that can get me through at least 75% of any shoot I get.

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Jeffery Salter Shoots Dancers At Bahia Honda Rail Bridge

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Videos

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Jeffery Salter is as passionate about his personal projects as he is about his commercial jobs. For this project, for example, he brought two dancers to Bahia Honda Rail Bridge to explore the relationship between people and beautiful architecture.

Jeffery Salter describes his photographic style as “cinematic with a touch of whimsy.” He draws inspiration from surreal artists, mostly painters, and from the cinema. “I keep my eyes open even when I don’t have a camera with me,” he says.

Jeffery, who has travelled the 127 mile long road in the Florida Keys many times, is fascinated by the Key Bridges – a series of bridges which connect the forty-three islands. He had since long wanted to do a personal project about them. Now was the time.

“Its combination of structural strength and graphic lines create a surreal sense of beauty,” replies Jeffery, when asked what is so special about the old Bahia Honda Rail bridge. “It’s magnificent in sheer functionally. You know, it has withstood extreme weather conditions, even hurricanes,” he explains.

The idea behind the project was to put the bridge’s long lasting grandeur and strong graphic lines in contrast with the fleeting moment of grace and soft curves of a dancer. “I wanted to marry the lines in the bridges to the lines of the human form,” he says.

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Drew Gurian’s 5 Minute portrait with Ted Dwane of Mumford & Sons

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait photography

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5-minute portrait

©Drew Gurian

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind the scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This is the first part of his story.

When working with a notable personality in front of the camera, your time as a photographer is generally very limited. The bigger they are, the less time you get, and five minutes (or less) is what you can expect to have in this type of situation.

Of course, the idea is to hopefully get to the location or studio with more than enough time to set up, so that when the talent arrives, you can do when you need to do, and get them on their way.

My current record for a portrait sitting was with the rock band, Primus, who I shot last summer at a backstage portrait studio I had set up right outside of their RV. They walked out of the RV, onto my set, and then directly to the main stage to headline the festival.  I shot them in 18 seconds.

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